Used Ferrari F50 cars for sale

raccars.co.uk currently have 2 used Ferrari F50 cars for sale

Ferrari F50

2-Door

£1,799,950
1996
£35,359.64 per month
Show representative example >
  • 13,650
  • Manual
  • Petrol
Call the dealer:020 3131 9195View vehicle

Ferrari F50

2-Door

Reduced by £100,000 was £2,299,950
 
£2,199,950
1997
£43,221.93 per month
Show representative example >
  • 2,285
  • Manual
  • Petrol
Call the dealer:020 3131 9195View vehicle

Used Ferrari F50

Background

Ferrari's F40 successor, the F50, was sold from 1995-1997 in celebration of the marque's 50th anniversary. As the replacement to an extremely successful supercar, the F50 had some very big shoes to fill. Over the next two years 349 units were produced, modelled on Ferrari's Formula One entrants. The design brief for the F50 was to produce an 'F1 car dressed as a road car', a direct rival to the McLaren F1.
 
The F50 used an existing Ferrari engine from the 333 SP, a racing success in the American IMCA series, which was itself a reworking of the 92A's 3.5 litre V12 from 1992's Formula One season. The rear-mounted 4.7 litre V12 developed 513bhp and came with a six-speed manual gearbox. 
 
While the F50's straight-line statistics didn't quite keep up with its rival at McLaren or even its own F40 predecessor, this car was designed to afford a more rewarding driving experience and Ferrari seem to have accomplished this, having no trouble selling the full production run. Sales were equally spread between Ferrari's largest markets, the USA, Germany and Italy, at 50 units each, with the remainder shared between Asia and the rest of Europe.
 
Ferrari was rightly immensely proud of its achievement with the F50, while also claiming that this would be the last time a road car would be built from an F1 base, due to increasingly strict emissions regulations worldwide.
 
Three GT racing units were also produced, plus the odd special edition for the Sultan of Brunei.
 
Bang for your buck
 
This two-door, two-seater has the low, sleek bodywork and massive forward air intakes typical of Ferrari, sweeping back to a bold, aggressive rear end. Berlinetta versions featured an integral hardtop whereas the Barchetta replaced the roof with two roll bars.
 
The design was all about the aerodynamics rather than the aesthetics, but the result has a controversial beauty of its own which divided critics. Five colours were available: Rosso Corsa (red and by far the bestselling colourway), Giallo Modena (yellow), Rosso Barchetta (dark red), Argento Nurburgring (silver) and Nero Daytona (black). Only four models were produced of each of these last two.
 
A carbon fibre monocoque hub is matched with a cast iron block and aluminium cylinder heads, electronic damper control, double wishbone suspension, Brembo vented disc brakes and 18" Speedline magnesium alloys. 
 
Interior-wise, the F50 is functional but not uncomfortable. Seats are part Connolly leather, while the driving position is adjustable at both seat and pedal levels and there are F1 comfort touches in the heel-rest and climate control. An F1-style LCD function display includes a sporty statistics bank and joins other F1 features, such as four-point harnesses and spartan upholstery. Windows are manual.
 
What you'll pay
 
As you would expect, such extreme exclusivity and performance doesn't come cheap. Expect to pay close to half a million pounds for one of these babies.
 
What to check
 
The beauty of the F50's base, Formula One, could also be its downfall. While F1 cars are undeniably made to tough standards, they are also made for short-term use and ultra-low mileage. Not many F50s will rack up the sort of mileage made by a salesman in a Mondeo but, nonetheless, caveat emptor.
 
Parts
 
If you have to ask, you can't afford it...
 
How it drives 
 
3.8 seconds from 0-60mph is not to be sniffed at but these things are relative. While a Ferrari F50 blows the pants off most other road going cars, it doesn't quite match its supercar rivals, its predecessor the F40 or the McLaren F1, for torque or speed statistics. The top speed of 202mph (officially at least) is more than you need on your average supermarket run but wasn't quite world beating.
 
Where the F50 gains over its rivals is handling, offering a stability and responsiveness that made for a far more dynamic driving experience. It's hard to forget how much this car is rooted in its F1 origins, with ABS, power steering and power brakes all noticeable by their absence. However this arguably just makes for a more involving drive.
 
One thing's for sure: the F50 is not a car for the faint-hearted. You need to have the skills and experience to match your bank account if you're planning to buy one.

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