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Future Classic Cars

By raccars Published

Pictured Above: Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider

The market for classic cars is not to be sneered at – with many examples of automobiles increasing in worth by two or three times (and perhaps more), getting your hands on a coveted motor has become one of the most profitable pastimes. Looking back at some of the most desired cars today, it’s interesting to see which ones are now considered classics, although knowing what could be highly valued in the future requires a vast knowledge and the foresight to recognise a potentially great or unusual car. Just like older cars that now command classic status, there are cars on the market that are gaining a following and are slowly rising in value. Below are our picks for what we think are going to be future classics – see if you agree!

Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider

Alfa Romeo have always had a unique approach to manufacturing their cars, with a definitive focus on eye-catching styling. Alfa’s roots in competitive racing have also lent a hand to the performance of some of its earliest cars, one of which was the Alfa Romeo Spider. Known as the ‘Duetto,’ the Spider was a sleek soft-top defined by a boat-tail rear-end and great handling. Latter examples offered an even better driving experience, thanks in part to the 1750cc engine, although older examples are still all the rage. An appearance in Hollywood smash ‘The Graduate’ has caused these convertibles to command a premium – expect to pay anywhere between £20000 to just over the 30 grand mark to get your hands on one.

Audi TT Mk1

Audi TT Mk1

The first iteration of Audi’s hugely successful TT line has aged incredibly well – a testament to not only the design of the car, but the performance on hand too. Sultry curves were complemented by a range of great engines; initially only a 1.8 turbocharged was available, although this quickly became the go-to option for most buyers. Four-wheel Quattro drive with a choice of either 178bhp or 222bhp was offered, propelling the TT to 62mph in a little over six seconds, whilst handling was surprisingly nimble for such a weighty car. This weight does, however, have some bearing on the front wishbones and anti-roll bar, which means a thorough check over prior to putting your money down would be advisable. On the upside, these great little movers can be picked up for £10,000 or less – definitely a steal.

BMW E46 M3

BMW E46 M3

BMW’s E46 is arguably one of the best M3’s ever made. Fifteen years down the line and the E46 still holds up remarkably well in comparison to today’s cars, taking just five seconds to hit 62mph and having one of the fastest lap times on the Nurburgring. It’s commanding yet sophisticated stance is yet another reason to love it, although exactly what flavour your M3 comes is entirely dependent on personal preference. Their popularity means that there are a hugely diverse range of E46’s to choose from – expect to find examples with and without facelifts, different transmissions, and tuning for various purposes. However, as you can imagine, there are both good and bad examples on hand, simply due to the sheer amount of cars available. You can expect to pay between ten and fifteen grand for any of these.

Mazda MX-5 Mk I

Mazda MX-5 Mk I

A very popular, and very cheap classic, the original Mazda MX-5 was one of the pioneering roadsters of its time. Blending a suitably-British design, along with Japanese engineering, the MX-5 was both sporty and reliable. A high-point was the MX-5’s twin-cam engine, which provided gutsy performance; combined with great handling and grip, as well as a very precise gearshift. Pleasingly, this nimble little drop top also proved to hold up over high mileages, a probable factor into why so many are circulating the used car market. Buying one will set you back between £1000 and £4000 depending on their condition; there are plenty of them owned by car enthusiasts, and so should be well looked-after (or modified greatly)!

Peugeot 205 GTi

Peugeot 205 GTi

Probably one of Peugeot’s most recognisable models, the 205 GTi is the most potent version of the French manufacturer’s nippy little hot hatch. Simultaneously transforming Peugeot’s pedestrian image whilst forming an audience that would elevate the hatchback to cult status, the 205 GTi was adored by motorists everywhere. European owners make up the majority, with a fanbase that loved the 205 for its adept handling, and solid range of power. The pick of the bunch is the deceptively competent 1.6-litre engine, whose shorter gearing makes it fun to swing around, although the 1.9 is truly where speed freaks will find their comfort zone. Bunched in with the GTi’s impressive functionality and iconic status, the asking price (£3,000 - £10,000) doesn’t seem much at all.

Porsche 944

Porsche 944

The Porsche 944 was a stylish coupe with a hearty helping of power to match. Porsche’s tumultuous years during the 1980’s were eased somewhat by the success of this model, helping to keep them afloat – and also served as the perfect bridge between the iconic 911 and the less gutsy 924. Over time Porsche tweaked the 944, revising the interior and later increasing engine capacity. Its svelte build gave it great road presence, plus the combination of a V8 engine and fantastic handling and grip made it a truly desirable sports car for the times. Unique in its own right, top examples go from around £15,000, all the way down to £3500 if you’re willing to put a little work in.

Saab 900 Cabriolet

Saab 900 Cabriolet

Saab’s automotive run has sadly come to an end, but their most recognisable vehicle, the Saab 900, is still treasured by car enthusiasts everywhere. Making up a huge 30% of sales at its peak, the convertible version was popular for its stylish looks and comfortable handling. First produced in 1978, the 900 underwent various changes before being replaced in 1993, including the addition of a four-door saloon, redesigned seats and a handy Automatic Performance Control feature. Whilst it won’t be challenging most the entries on this list, it was never meant to – summertime cruising is prime time for the cabriolet. Find one with less than 150k miles for between two and six grand and you’re onto a winner.

Subaru Impreza Turbo

Subaru Impreza Turbo

It’s easy to see why the Subaru Impreza Turbo was such a popular model – its rallying disposition made it a favourite among racers everywhere. Racing fans loved the range of tuning options available, which were not only stellar, but very affordable, and even allowed buyers to upgrade the Impreza’s platform on later models for specific uses such as track days. The original Impreza wowed with its tactile chassis, fantastic grip and accessible power, placing it highly in the variety of brilliant performance cars released during the 1990’s – one reason why prices only seem to be on the rise. The other would be the dwindling number of examples still on the road, so a top-end price of £8000 is only surprising in that it’s still so cheap!

TVR Griffith

TVR Griffith

The heralded 1990 Motor Show was the first place avid motorists got a glance at the TVR Griffith, a lightweight roadster fitted with a powerful 4.3-litre V8 engine. The result was a British bullet that could hit 62mph in 4.7 seconds, and coupled its affinity for speed with wonderful handling and looks. The arrival of the Griffith made Porsche and Ferrari seem somewhat less impressive, and was a success despite the steep asking price. The option of engines, trims and various specs during the Griffith’s lifetime means that prospective buyers are spoilt for choice, and a dedicated TVR owners’ club means that there is all the aftermarket support you can get, whether you spend £15,000 or £25,000.

Volkswagen Corrado

Volkswagen Corrado

Volkswagen’s original Scirocco was replaced by the brilliant yet shunned Corrado. Built at a time when Volkswagen could have done with the support, the Corrado’s high price stunted its run, despite its now obvious merits. Performance was incredible, especially for the VR6 model, and its sleek lines and impressive stance make it easy to see this car was greatly overlooked. The above reasons, however, are why the Corrado is destined for classic status, although the circulation of German imports during the 90’s mean that models suffering wear and tear from being slugged about (Autobahn, anyone?) mean that buyers should be cautious. Still, you can pick one of these up for less than four grand – and probably sell it for even more.

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